Race Race Race Race Race Race Race Race Race Race Race Race Race Race

Millennials and Racial Reconciliation

This is Trip’s talk from the ERLC Summit on the Gospel and Racial Reconciliation. Below is the manuscript from that message.

This evening, I’ve been asked to speak about millennials and racial reconciliation. And I feel privileged to stand here and serve as part of this amazing effort towards unity in God’s church.

As a rapper, I’ve been a part of a lot of concerts over the years with lots of millennials and people of all age ranges. And I’ve seen that music really has a way of unifying people. There are some concerts where there is only one demographic of people: maybe it’s all soccer moms and white suburban teens, or all urban college students, or all southern baptist pastors wearing khakis (Alright, maybe not that last one). But there are also many where there are all kinds of people— young and old, black and white, and many other groups. And people who observe it often marvel at the diversity, and I think it’s a really good thing as well.

While I do think that’s cool and wonderful, I do not think it’s as impressive as some make it out to be. Every day there are…

Coulda Been Me Lyrics

Produced by: Gawvi
Additional Vocals by: J. Paul
Artwork by: Alex Medina
Mixed and Mastered by: Jacob “Biz” Morris

Verse 1:
Don’t nobody wanna hear our pain
That’s how I’m feeling when I’m flipping through them twitter comments, all I feel is rain
They telling me get over it’s old
That stuff don’t exist no more
But that don’t ring true when I look in these streets
So it’s real when I feel like it coulda been me

Hook:
Man can I tell you how I’m feeling right now
Ah they wanna know how I’m feeling right now
I feel like it coulda been me
I feel like it coulda been me
We all made in God’s image you know
All our lives matter, our vision is broke
We feel pain cause we been here before
Who’s innocent I don’t know
But it coulda been me
I feel like it coulda been me

Verse 2:
I didn’t know Mike Brown
I ain’t know Trayvon
I didn’t know Sean Bell
But I know they gone
I ain’t know Oscar Grant or Tamir Rice
I didn’t know Eric Garner
But I know they life
Is worth more than they saying on the tv screen
I hate I got a long list, you finna see me scream
Cause I feel like they don’t see we kings
Made to rule like Him,…

Coulda Been Me

My heart is heavy. I know God is good, and that He’s in control, but my heart is heavy.

Last week after the events in Ferguson (and the responses to it on social media), I felt burdened to write a song. My goal wasn’t to make any grand statements or declarations, but to express the way that everything made me feel. So I started writing, and this is what came out. The sentiment that echoed in my mind was: “It could’ve been me.”

I had a whole post ready on how Christians should respond in times like these, but after the news about Eric Garner yesterday, I decided to wait and post that later. For now, I just want to say that I have a heavy heart. I’m not interested in debates or arguments right now. I just want the freedom to express my hurt.

I’m hurting because that Eric Garner video is devastating to watch. When my wife and I first watched it months ago, we both cried. Life is a beautiful gift, and it’s sobering to watch that life leave someone’s body — especially when it’s taken by other men. I thought, “Surely people can’t get away with…

Should We Move On?

I’ve kept up with the Trayvon Martin saga from the beginning. Like many of you I watched the news coverage, read the articles, and talked about it with friends. It dominated public conversation and provoked a much needed discussion about race in America. The ugly reality of racism was pushed in front of our faces, and even those who like to pretend it doesn’t exist were forced to talk about it.

Over a year later, Trayvon’s killer has been tried and found not guilty. Does that mean we should move on from the issues? They found him innocent, so these “race issues” must not be as real as we thought they were, right? That couldn’t be further from the truth. I have no intention of arguing about the facts, Trayvon’s character, or the verdict in this tragic situation, but I do think some discussion should continue. The trial is over, but the conversation shouldn’t be.

Why the Interest?

I know there are many who wonder why this particular trial has captured the attention of so many. Others wonder why some black folks are so quick to sympathize with Trayvon Martin, despite the fact that he had issues of his own. After all,…